Kindred Handicrafts

Water-Based Ink for the Win!

Jennie WhitakerComment

Yesterday I was wearing one of my favorite shirts. Okay, so they are admittedly all my favorite at some point. Let’s just say it was my “shirt of the week”. Well now I have to tell you, it was the “There Should Be A Thousand Yellow Daisies” shirt. I love the yellow on gray and thought, I wonder if people feel the same way I do about these shirts and appreciate the craft. 

You see, I love them. I really do. I love the feel, the designs and the way they wear over time. Most shirts shrink, but I swear these shirts adapt to fit perfectly. And, even though they run a bit small to begin with (consider ordering up a size, or two, if you like a less fitted shirt), I think they become broken in quickly. I’m also a lover of all things vintage and appreciate the way water based ink fades. You know, so you don’t have that “new haircut” look every time you wear your shirt. 

From what I’ve learned, I think water based inks are better for the environment and in my humble opinion I think they wear better over time. If you want to extend the life of your shirt, we suggest that you wash it inside out in cool water and dry it on low heat or save the earth and hang dry it. 

And, since I’m not sure if you’ve seen the process done I’ll include a few photos from a shirt we printed today. It’s manual labor for sure, and there are so many steps that I can honestly say every shirt is a work of art! We’re so proud of our little operation here and we hope you love your shirt as much as we love making them! After all, it’s 2016 and most of your clothes aren’t crafted by hand, especially not your tee shirts. If you ever have a question about our screen printing process, just ask. We'd love to tell you all about it! 

This is what it looks like before we flood the screen. 

This is what it looks like before we flood the screen. 

When you're ready to make a shirt, after a zillion steps to prepare the screens and perfect the design, you flood the screen with ink. 

When you're ready to make a shirt, after a zillion steps to prepare the screens and perfect the design, you flood the screen with ink. 

After you flood the shirt you use a giant squeegee (you thought it was a funny word to say, I had to spell check it twice to believe that's how it's spelled!) to press into the screen and make sure the ink goes through the screen in all the places there isn't any emulsion. 

After you flood the shirt you use a giant squeegee (you thought it was a funny word to say, I had to spell check it twice to believe that's how it's spelled!) to press into the screen and make sure the ink goes through the screen in all the places there isn't any emulsion. 

And, finally, ta-da! This is what your shirts look like right before I wrap them up in yarn and ship them to your doorstep! 

And, finally, ta-da! This is what your shirts look like right before I wrap them up in yarn and ship them to your doorstep!